nasa releases sound recordings recorded on jupiter's ganymede satellite

                                                                Photo by NASA on Unsplash

The U.S. space and space agency's Juno spacecraft has recorded what they call "ghostly" sounds, according to Jupiter's largest satellite, ganymede.

NASA's jet propulsion laboratory said that a 50-minute audio recording had been successfully produced from records collected by Juno during its 7th ganymede crossing this year.

This audio recording consists of a series of "beep" and "bloop" sounds in different frequencies.

Ganymede is the largest moon on our sun - the only moon that has its own magnetic field. With a diameter of 3,280 miles (5,262 kilometers), ganymede is even larger in size based on Mercury and the dwarf planet Pluto.

The spacecraft's 7 june 2000 orbit is the closest to using ganymede since NASA's Galileo spacecraft made its approach in May 2000.

"The soundtrack is relatively wild to make you feel as if you're driving a vehicle as juno sails past ganymede for the first time in more than two decades," physicist Scott Bolton said in a statement.

"If you listen accurately, you can hear a sudden change to a higher frequency at approximately the midpoint of the recording, which shows the entry of different regions in the ganymede magnetosphere," he added. The plane arrived on July 4, 2016 after a five-year journey.

It created a close flight near Ganymede on June 7, 2021 and became the closest spacecraft to a moon since the flight approached galileo in May 2000.

Juno's solar-powered spacecraft was at a break of 645 miles (1,038 kilometers) according to the surface of ganymede and gait using a relative speed of 41,600 miles consistent with the clock (sixty seven,000 kilometers in step with hour).

The audio recording data was collected by Juno's waves, which captures electrical and magnetic radio waves obtained in Jupiter's large magnetic field or magnetosphere.

Juno's space https://app.cnnindonesia.com/pesawat was launched according to cape canaveral, Florida in August 2011 to look at Jupiter according to its orbit. The plane arrived on Jupiter on July 4, 2016, after traveling for five years.

It created a close flight near Ganymede on June 7, 2021, becoming the closest spacecraft to a moon since the flight approached galileo in May 2000.

The audio recording data was collected by Juno's waves, which captures electrical &magnetic radio waves obtained in Jupiter's large magnetic field or magnetosphere.

Nasa's Juno spacecraft has recorded what they call "ghostly" sounds based on Jupiter's largest satellite, ganymede.NASA's jet propulsion laboratory said a 50-minute audio recording had been successfully produced from records collected by Juno during its 7th ganymede crossing this year.

This audio recording consists according to a series of "beep" and "bloop" sounds in frequencies that bhineka.ganymede is the largest moon on our sun and the only moon that has its own magnetic field. Using a diameter of 3,280 miles (5,262 kilometers), ganymede is even larger than Mercury and the dwarf planet Pluto.

The spacecraft's 7 june crash was the closest to ganymede since NASA's Galileo spacecraft made its approach in May 2000.

"The soundtrack is wild enough to make you feel as if you're driving as Juno sails past ganymede for the first time in more than two decades," said lead expert Scott Bolton of the Southwest Research Institute in san antonio.

"If you listen accurately, you can hear a sudden change to a higher frequency around the midpoint of the recording, which tells you about the entry of different regions in the ganymede magnetosphere."

Juno was launched in Cape Canaveral, Florida, in August 2011 to examine Jupiter according to its orbit. The plane arrived on Jupiter in July 4, 2016 after traveling for five years.

This created a close flight to Ganymede on June 7, 2021, as the closest spacecraft has come to using a moon since its close flight to Galileo in May 2000.

At the time of this flight the Juno spacecraft, which has an engine powered by the sun, was within 645 miles (1,038 kilometers) according to the surface of ganymede , moving using a relative speed of 41,600 miles in step with the clock (sixty seven,000 kilometers per hour).

The audio recording data was collected by Juno's waves, which captures electrical and magnetic radio waves generated in Jupiter's massive magnetic field or magnetosphere.

The flight approached ganymede on June 7, 2021, as the closest spacecraft to a moon since its approach to Galileo in May 2000.

The audio recording data was collected by Juno's waves, which captures electrical and magnetic radio waves obtained in Jupiter's grand magnetic field or magnetosphere.

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